Security is becoming a major concern these days. Our devices can become vulnerable to hackers, even if we make the slightest mistake. Install an untrusted app,  and your phone crashes. Or even worse, your data gets stolen. From personal pictures to account information, anything can be stolen. But the question is, should you worry about yours?

Do Our Smartphones Provide Optimum Security?

There are all kinds of fights going on between users of different OS’s. Which one is faster, better or has better security and what not. The truth is, that all the major mobile operating systems are secure – Windows Phone, Android, iOS, Blackberry OS etc. It’s the users who are not. The developers of these security systems spend hard hours making sure that nobody gets into your phone and steals your data. But if a user installs some app from outside of the Play Store or the App Store, there are high chances that it’s going to be malicious. It’s because that mobile phones are everywhere and it’s easy for a hacker to target large amount of audiences via just an app.

Now, you may think that nobody needs your data or whatever, because you are just a regular person. As true as that might be, you should never take a risk. It could be somebody trying to get your bank details, or even your sweet enemy trying to get your personal data. So what should you do?

iOS

Apple's answer to security

iOS is considered to be one of the most secure mobile operating system. But in recent events, almost 200 private pictures of celebrities were leaked online. It is said that this data was leaked by hackers via Apple’s iCloud service. But, Apple said that those pictures weren’t directly stolen off their servers via an exploit. The hackers used more targeted approaches like phishing. So, that means that your device is pretty secure, but trusting a source which is not reliable could get you into a lot of trouble. To be safe, you could delete personal pictures from your iCloudstay away from jailbreaks (at least the unofficial/fishy repos or non-app store ipa’s) and even keep away from suspicious websites.

Android

Some people consider Android to be full of vulnerabilities and malware apps. But, Android is pretty damn secure too. The problem is with users, again installing third party APKs. The main problem here is that not all people get access to the latest and the greatest Android version. There are still many people on Gingerbread or Jellybean. Google includes many security updates with every Android version update. So if you don’t update or tend to live with your phone for a few years, that could lead to you being pretty vulnerable to attacks. How to stay safe? Update your phone to the latest version, encrypt your phone if you’ve got really sensitive data, and do not install apps from outside of the Play Store.

So now you know that your OEMs are doing a good job trying to protect you. Apple and Samsung have chosen to add fingerprint security to their smartphones. Other operating systems like Windows Phone and BlackBerry OS are secure too. BlackBerry is known for it’s enterprise security.  So at the end, it almost doesn’t make a difference which operating system you use if you’re an average user. The thing which you have to take care of the most is being fooled by the person trying to attack you. And just don’t do anything stupid.

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TechDissected

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1,055 Comments

  • @Yug

    Good post.

    However, I think it has to be said, the question you pose should be stated a different way:

    “How Do You Define Smartphone Security and Should You Care?” I add the qualifier because as you already note, you could delete all your data from your chosen smartphone (Android. iPhone, Windows) and you could delete all your Cloud synced data yet your security would still be in question.

    Data security is one thing yet, as we both know, data security isn’t the only type of security smartphones compromise. To me, the bigger risk with smartphone tech isn’t phishing or data breeches – it’s physical location tracking. Even though it seems evident, I would bet most smartphone users don’t think about how a smartphone can track your every movement regardless if GPS is turned on or not.

    More and more our cities are becoming increasingly wired, monitored, secured with cameras and connected devices. Walking around in London or NYC is to know your every movement is being recorded by a lurking camera or device which you can or can’t see. Add to this your smartphone leaving a live tracking symbol to your coordinates and you have a serious matter of personal privacy and security.

    I agree with your assertion/question: “Now, you may think that nobody needs your data or whatever, because you are just a regular person. As true as that might be, you should never take a risk. It could be somebody trying to get your bank details, or even your sweet enemy trying to get your personal data. So what should you do?”

    Yet as noted, the problem goes deeper and becomes more tactile as it seeps from data to physical.

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